eventgrafik-2014


08.08.2014

Please Fasten Your Seatbelt: Lachenmann's Got Lost

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Nothing compares to seeing a composer passionately discussing his music.

 

On August 5 and 6, Helmut Lachenmann hosted a 2-session workshop on his 30-minute long piece for soprano and piano Got Lost (2007/2008) in Großer Saal, Akademie für Tonkunst, Darmstadt. Instead of the scheduled open rehearsal, Lachenmann decided to walk through his piece with the audience, detail by detail, in a lecture recital setting.


"I am a noise maker."

 

The idea of Lachenmann as a noise maker is not surprising - his music is well-known as musique concrète instrumentale - but he was amazingly engaging as he demonstrated how he used the text as his sound source. He treated the text phonetically and put them into 18 categories by their physical acoustic properties. Going back and forth between the score and the handout demonstrated Lachenmann's thoughtful choices of sounds at a micro-level.

 

"A sound is not just a sound, it has a context."

 

Although he has sliced the text into its smallest units and put them into boxes, he repeatedly returned to the idea of the sounds in context; emphasizing the connection between sounds has always been a very important element in his music. Lachenmann's engagement with sounds then extended to a call for the audience's attentive listening; as he says, "the art of listening is with sensitivity, intelligence and concentration."

 

It would have been a more thorough guide if time had allowed him to explain all his sound categories in Got Lost. Nevertheless, the demonstration by Yukiko Sugawara (piano) and Yuko Kakuta (soprano) filled in the missing information with their brilliant performance. The workshop was spiced up by Lachenmann's lively and humorous presentation; he engaged the audience by first engaging himself.

 

"Please fasten you seatbelt!" he said, before the piece's run-through in the latter part of the workshop. The performance of Got Lost was not only a demonstration of Lachenmann's sound explorations in text but also a testimony of a composer who, writing the piece in his seventies, continues his lifelong commitment to sound.

By Viola Yip
08.08.2014

Nothing compares to seeing a composer passionately discussing his music.

 

On August 5 and 6, Helmut Lachenmann hosted a 2-session workshop on his 30-minute long piece for soprano and piano Got Lost (2007/2008) in Großer Saal, Akademie für Tonkunst, Darmstadt. Instead of the scheduled open rehearsal, Lachenmann decided to walk through his piece with the audience, detail by detail, in a lecture recital setting.